Archive for December 18, 2011

Fokker F.XVIII

Posted: December 18, 2011 in Aircraft, Airliners, Airport, AVIATION, Commercial, History

The Fokker F.XVIII was an airliner produced in the Netherlands in the early 1930s, essentially a scaled-up version of the Fokker F.XII intended for long-distance flights. Like its predecessor, it was a conventional high-wing cantilever monoplane with fixed tailwheel undercarriage. Its cabin could seat 12 passengers, or four-to-six on seats convertible to sleeping berths. Used by KLM on its Amsterdam-Batavia route, the F.XVIII became celebrated in the Netherlands due to two especially noteworthy flights. In December 1933, one aircraft (registration PH-AIP, Pelikaan – “Pelican”) was used to make a special Christmas mail flight to Batavia, completing the round trip in a flight time of 73 hours 34 minutes. The following Christmas, another F.XVIII (registration PH-AIS, Snip – “Snipe”) made a similar flight to Curaçao in 55 hour 58 minutes after having been specially re-engined for the journey.

In October 1936, the F.XVIIIs were withdrawn from the service to Batavia, replaced by the Douglas DC-2. KLM sold two to ČSA who used them on its Prague-Vienna-Berlin route, and Pelikaan to Air Tropique, a front for the Spanish Nationalist government which used it as a transport during the Spanish Civil War. The two remaining aircraft, however, were retained by KLM for regional services in the Caribbean. One of these was the Snip, the other was PH-AIO, originally named Oehoe (“Owl”), but renamed Oriol (“Oriole”) since the Owl was regarded as unlucky in the local culture. These machines remained in service until 1946, and the forward fuselage section of Snip is preserved at the Curaçao Museum.

Medusa

Posted: December 18, 2011 in Art Book, Greek Mythology, WEIRD



In Greek mythology Medusa (Greek: Μέδουσα (Médousa), ” guardian, protectress”) was a Gorgon, a chthonic monster, and a daughter of Phorcys and Ceto. The author Hyginus, (Fabulae, 151) interposes a generation and gives Medusa another chthonic pair as parents. Gazing directly upon her would turn onlookers to stone. She was beheaded by the hero Perseus, who thereafter used her head as a weapon until he gave it to the goddess Athena to place on her shield. In classical antiquity the image of the head of Medusa appeared in the evil-averting device known as the Gorgoneion.

The three Gorgon sisters—Medusa, Stheno, and Euryale—were all children of the ancient marine deities Phorcys (or Phorkys) and his sister Ceto (or Keto), chthonic monsters from an archaic world. Their genealogy is shared with other sisters, the Graeae, as in Aeschylus’s Prometheus Bound, which places both trinities of sisters far off “on Kisthene’s dreadful plain”:

Near them their sisters three, the Gorgons, winged
With snakes for hair— hated of mortal man—

While ancient Greek vase-painters and relief carvers imagined Medusa and her sisters as beings born of monstrous form, sculptors and vase-painters of the fifth century began to envisage her as being beautiful as well as terrifying. In an ode written in 490 BC Pindar already speaks of “fair-cheeked Medusa”.

In a late version of the Medusa myth, related by the Roman poet Ovid (Metamorphoses 4.770), Medusa was originally a ravishingly beautiful maiden, “the jealous aspiration of many suitors,” priestess in Athena’s temple, but when she and the “Lord of the Sea” Poseidon were caught together by Athena’s temple, the enraged Athena transformed Medusa’s beautiful hair to serpents and made her face so terrible to behold that the mere sight of it would turn onlookers to stone. In Ovid’s telling, Perseus describes Medusa’s punishment by Minerva (Athena) as just and well earned.

In African mythology (prior to Greece’s adaptation of Medusa), Medusa was a Libyan goddess.{Walker, Barbara G., The Women’s Encyclopedia of Myths & Secrets} She was a serpent goddess of female wisdom.{Walker, Barbara G., The Women’s Encyclopedia of Myths & Secrets} Female wisdom, healing, birth, rebirth, and other positive traits of nature have long been associated with serpents.


Play BINGO At Home

Posted: December 18, 2011 in Advertising, Comic, Games, History


History of Marketing Channels

Posted: December 18, 2011 in Cool, Creative, History, How To